'All' or 'Every'



In this lesson, you will learn the difference between all and every.

All and every have one thing in common: they are both used to talk about a lot of people or things.

All is used when talking about the total number or whole of a thing.

All employees must complete an annual health check.

All passengers must get in line before boarding the plane.

We also use all with uncountable nouns and plural nouns.

All books need to be returned to the shelves when not in use.

All used clothing should be cleaned before donating.

All reports are due by the end of the week.

Using All of

All of is primarily used just before a personal pronoun (you, us, them, my, etc.), a demonstrative pronoun (this, that, these, those), or a relative pronoun (whom, which).

All of my clothes got wet in the storm.

Please go to the beach early so you can find a spot for all of us.

We don't have room for all of these people.

Your colleagues, all of whom are not here today, will attend the training with you next week.

Every (this includes everyone, everybody, everything, and everywhere) is used when talking about each individual member of a group or each individual thing in a group.

Every donated gift will be inspected prior to delivering to the children.

Everyone who attended the meeting this morning will receive a complimentary pen and note pad.

Because every refers to individual members (or items) of a bigger group, we only use it with singular nouns.

With day

All day refers to one entire day as a whole. This is also true for all week, all month, and all year.

You've been working on this problem all day.

Do not add an s to the end of day/week/month/year.

NO--> You've been working on this problem all days.

Every day refers to each individual day. Again, this is also true for every week, every month, and every year.

I've been getting up at 6 am every day for the last six weeks.

Do not add an s to the end of day/week/month/year.

NO--> I've been getting up at 6 amevery days for the last six weeks.


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