How's the weather?



I don't have any statistics, but the weather has got to be one of the most discussed topics of all time. It's a very fascinating topic for many people and most just can't seem to shut up about it. There are many ways to ask about the weather and describe the weather.

Asking about the weather

Most English language learners are taught to ask, "How's the weather?" and while this is not wrong, it's not something native English speakers say that often. Here's a list of questions commonly used to ask about the weather.

How's the weather out there?

What's the weather like this weekend?

What's the weather like outside?

What's it like outside?

What's it doing outside?

What's the temperature tomorrow? (Temperature is often shortened to 'temp')

What's the forecast for New Year's Eve?

Is it cold out?

Nice day, huh?

What did the weather man (woman) say about tomorrow?

Is it sunny out?

When we're curious about the weather in your country or city we ask,

What's the weather like where you're from?

What's the weather like over there?

Do you get a lot of snow?

Do you have rain?

Describing the weather

We teach young learners to say,

It's rainy.

It's snowy.

It's windy.

It's sunny.

Again, these phrases are not wrong, but there are other more commonly used phrases to describe the weather.

Rain

It's really coming down. (heavy)

It's pouring out. (heavy)

It's sprinkling a bit. (light)

You need your umbrella.

You need your rain boots.

The skies have opened up. (Really heavy rain. Just stay home.)

Looks like rain.

It's raining hard. (heavy)

It's drizzling. (light)

It's wet out. (light to medium)

Snow/Cold or Cool Weather

We're having a blizzard.

It's really coming down out there.

It's just snow flurries.

It's snowing out.

It's sleeting out. (Snow/Rain mix)

You just need a light jacket. (It's cool outside.)

It's freezing.

It's cold.

I'm freezing my butt off. (Means: I'm really cold. I want to go home.)

I'm turning into an icicle. (Means: I'm really cold. Take me home now.)

It's cold as hell. (Means: It's really cold. You can stay, but I'm leaving.)

Sunny/Hot or Warm Weather

It's nice out.

It's sunny today.

It's beautiful outside.

It's blazing. (Means: It's too hot. Just go home.)

I'm melting. (Means: It's hot and humid and I'm sweaty.)

It's sticky. (Means: It's hot and humid and my clothes are sticking to my back.)

It's hot.

It's hot as hell. (Means: It's really hot.)

It's sweltering. (Means: It's really hot and my shoes are melting.)

Windy

It's windy.

I almost blew away. (Means: Maybe you shouldn't go outside today.)


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